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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provide that information to you. so, we are tasked with providing the information. there have been about 300 small businesses that have received the lawsuits. knee individuals who use this mechanism and come up -- the individual to use this mechanism. while it is important to have ada access, but we want you to understand there are individuals out there taking a look at your vulnerability. we have a packet of informa
acting director in the mayor's office of disability, carla johnson. carla. thank you for joining us. thank you for being here today. [ applause ] our next supervisor who also does not need much of an introduction because he is at every single library opening. a terrific staunch supporter and advocate for public libraries supervisor scott wiener. thank you for joining us [ applause ] . >> thank you, luis and congratulations on this great day moving forward. i go to library openings partly because mine were done by the time i took office. i have public library opening envy. this project in particular, north beach branch library and joe dimaggio has had a special place in my heart and i have been especially an outspoken supporter of this project and, in fact when we were putting together prop b, the parks fund and we needed to make room in the for joe dimaggio, i went to the rec and park commission to have it included even though it wasn't in my district. some people have asked me scott why you do care so much about this project when it's not even in your district? we might be represen
on mission street in san francisco and joined by carla, the deputy director of spur and one of the persons who pushed this shelter in place and safe enough to stay concept and we want to talk about what it means and why it's important to san francisco. >> as you know the bay area as 63% chance of having a major earthquake and it's serious and going to impact a lot of people and particularly people in san francisco because we live on a major fault so what does this mean for us? part of what it means is that potentially 25% of san francisco's building stock will be uninhibit tabl and people can't stay in their homes after an earthquake. they may have to go to shelters or leave entirely and we don't want that to happen. >> we want a building stock to encourage them to stay in the homes and encourage them to stay and not relocate to other locations and shelters. >> that's right so that means the housing needs to be safe enough to stay and we have been focused in trying to define what that means and you as a former building official knows better than anybody the code says if an earthquake hap
helped us overcome some of the technical problems we faced. also carla johnson in the mayor's office of disability has been very general yus with her time and has been very helpful in helping us focus this legislation and not only make it helpful to sro tenants but also implementable and cost effective for owners. really it's a very straightforward proposition that we're presenting to you. it's two recommendations, one that there be working phone jacks in sro tenants' rooms. the necessity for that is very clear. we need to be able to have communication with the outside world, any of us do, but in particular people who have mobility issues, seniors who rely on care givers who may have emergencies that come up on a more regular basis than other residents need to be able to communicate with the outside world. it's absolutely critical that all of these rooms have working phone jacks. the second issue is to put grab bars in common bathrooms. again, a very commonsense idea. there are countless accidents that happen in sro's as a result of people slipping and falling in bathtubs. for the
, along with our carla johnson and our mayor's office of disability, and all the different agencies working together, we're going to make this successful. this is a family of agencies that care about our small businesses. last time i looked, there were over 71,000 businesses who registered that had less than 100 employees. that's an incredible sign of businesses that have -- that are our backbone, that hire a number of people. they're not the biggest employers, but they do hire the largest number of employees. over 51% of the city's employees are hired by small businesses. and i want to continue supporting them, nurturing them, have them increase. i hate seeing vacant, vacant buildings, vacant spots. benny knows every time we walk down there, what's going on with this site? what's going on with that site? char men chu knows that as well. we've done a lot of walks together. i want to see every one of these vacancies filled with small bustling business necessarition. we need them to hire more local folks. and one way to do it, one sure way to do it is to make sure that they meet the a
the right thing. after talking to carla short and her staff it was determined based on their examination that particular fig tree should come out. a major limit failed and at that point there has been decay occurring and i'm not an expert in this area, but there is, i guess a bacteria or fungal material that is causing the tree long-term harm. so it was recommended that this particular tree be removed in addition, to the other as part of this park project. i would be happy to answer any questions that you may have. >> are any of the pictures -- i believe this is your submission? >> that was the brief. >> are there any photographs that you can point to that would help us, help me see the site of the decay where the failure took place? >> again, i haven't climbed the tree and looked myself, but if you look at the horizontal picture of the tree it comes up to 6' and there are multiple branches coming off that, which is poor structure having multiple branches from one point is a weak point for branches. so the picture that you see here that i will put on overhead. this is looking dow
. >> good evening commissioners carla short, department of public works urban forestry. i don't really have anything to add to what dan said, but we did indicate this trees a tree appropriate for removal based on the recent limb failure and the presence of decay already. we're already seeing the signs of decay. the limb -- i didn't see it when it came off the tree as well, but based on what remains and i will switch photos on the overhead. basically this area is that limb that failed. so it does appear that it was probably a similar size to the other limbs, which is very typical for this species. they have a form that is not ideal. it's called decurrent. so they have multiple limits that emanate from the trunk at one point. the problem is it's more prone to limb failure inherently because of that form but once you have a limb failure, what we see is multiple failures after that. because the tree is now weakened at the union of all of those branches. so it is a beautiful tree. i am very sympathetic to mr. vigneau and i had previously worked with him to keep trees on the monitoring syste
. >> i would be more than happy to work with director hue and carla and dan lowry on a standard permit fee so it's consistent with the building code fee schedule. we can definitely look at that and see what we can come up with for possibly a standard fee for a simple application, but it will depend upon the estimated cost of work, et cetera. but we can definitely look at that. i think that's a great idea. >> obviously it has to match the -- this is probably getting off track here. i know commissioner -- one of the supervisors had a signed ordinance and you got a free permit if you did something within a certain number of months, i don't know. when we do come across those difficult installations, obviously no fault of anybody, just the nature of the building, and it turns into a pretty monumental job just to put the simple -- let's say all the wall has to be done and so on. that 6 month period obviously is going to take longer now. i'm sure you have something built in for people who are trying to do the right thing but because it turns into a job that's more than what they first
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)